The Master of Hell's Gates: William Kinghorne (1796-1878)


 

Captain William Kinghorne navigated some of the most treacherous waters in the world. His life encompassed the Napoleonic Wars, smuggling in the North Sea, the brutal penal settlements of Macquarie Harbour and Port Arthur, the atrocities committed against the aboriginal people of Tasmania, and the whaling industry of Jervis Bay. Turning his back on the sea, William ended his life as a pastoralist in the Goulburn district. His is a story of high adventure and achievement in an Australia that few would now recognise or acknowledge.

 

 Portrait of Captain William Kinghorne by T.J. Lempriere, 1834, oil on canvas. National Portrait Gallery, Canberra. Purchased with funds provided by The Ian Potter Foundation 2007.

Portrait of Captain William Kinghorne by T.J. Lempriere, 1834, oil on canvas. National Portrait Gallery, Canberra. Purchased with funds provided by The Ian Potter Foundation 2007.


 

.... gripping and enlivened by a great deal of colour. The authors display a real capacity to bring their central subject to life and they do the same for those around him, presenting a 'warts and all' study, which brings out Kinghorne's strengths as well as his weaknesses. There are fascinating pictures of the challenges and dangers facing a seafarer who was involved with ferrying convicts and venturing into little known waters. This book blends sober analysis with narrative skills and imaginative powers and will reward all who read it.

Emeritus Professor Brian Fletcher, OAM, FAHA

 

Resources available to download:

 

Appendix 1.  
The voyages of Captain William Kinghorne in the colonial government service of Van Diemen’s Land between 1822 and 1836. 


 

Appendix 4.
Cardross and Maxton Title Deeds.